War of 1812

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1813 Oct 5

Battle of Thames

Chatham-Kent, ON, Canada

The Battle of the Thames, also known as the Battle of Moraviantown, occurred on October 5, 1813, during the War of 1812 in Upper Canada, near Chatham. It resulted in a decisive American victory over the British and their Indigenous allies led by Shawnee leader Tecumseh. The British, under Major General Henry Procter, had been forced to retreat north from Detroit due to the loss of control over Lake Erie to the United States Navy, cutting off their supplies. Tecumseh's confederation of Indigenous tribes was a crucial part of the British alliance.


American forces, led by Major General William Henry Harrison, pursued the retreating British and engaged them in battle near the Thames River. The British position was poorly fortified, and Tecumseh's warriors attempted to flank the American forces but were overwhelmed. The British regulars were demoralized, and the American cavalry played a key role in breaking through their lines. During the battle, Tecumseh was killed, which dealt a significant blow to his confederacy. Ultimately, the British forces retreated, and the American control of the Detroit area was re-established.


The Battle of the Thames had a profound impact on the war. It led to the collapse of Tecumseh's confederation and the loss of British control over Southwestern Ontario. General Procter was later court-martialed for his poor leadership during the retreat and battle. The death of Tecumseh marked the end of a powerful Indigenous alliance and contributed to the overall decline of British influence in the region.

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Last Updated: Fri Oct 06 2023