Seven Years War

End French threat to Hanover
The Battle of Minden ©Image Attribution forthcoming. Image belongs to the respective owner(s).
1759 Aug 1

End French threat to Hanover

Minden, Germany

After a Prussian victory at Rossbach, and under pressure from Frederick the Great and William Pitt, King George II disavowed the treaty. In 1758, the allies launched a counter-offensive against the French and Saxon forces and drove them back across the Rhine. After the allies failed to defeat the French before reinforcements swelled their retreating army, the French launched a fresh offensive, capturing the fortress of Minden on 10 July. Believing Ferdinand's forces to be over-extended, Contades abandoned his strong positions around the Weser and advanced to meet the Allied forces in battle. The decisive action of the battle came when six regiments of British and two of Hanoverian infantry, in line formation, repelled repeated French cavalry attacks; contrary to all fears that the regiments would be broken. The Allied line advanced in the wake of the failed cavalry attack, sending the French army reeling from the field, ending all French designs upon Hanover for the remainder of the year. In Britain, the victory is celebrated as contributing to the Annus Mirabilis of 1759.


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Last Updated: : Thu Aug 18 2022